A blog about brilliant children’s books

Welcome to tygertale, a blog about brilliant children’s books. It’s a subject that just so happens to coincide with the thing I am currently avoiding – writing a children’s book.

Tygertale is named after the children’s book I’m writing, a comic sort-of sci fi adventure thing (nice pitch). The lead character Tyger is a bad girl in the scurrilous tradition of Pippi Longstocking, Beryl the Peril and Marmalade Atkins.

It’s also the name of those fantastic balloons that whizz around the room, screaming.

My day job is producing arts documentaries (or ‘films’ as we grandly call them) and writing proposals. These lovingly crafted treatments are read by an audience of up to four very important people. So not much different to this blog then. Here I am doing my job, talking to the children’s laureate Chris Riddell in his garden. You can see more from his laureate’s log here.

laureate log 1

The other images are taken from one of the children’s books that saved my life, Dr. Seuss’s Hop on Pop, one of the first books I learnt to read. Or is that learned to read? Either way, I’m still learning to write.

The rights of all images on the site belong to the authors /publishers / estates / whatever, and not me. Any objections please let me know and I’ll take them down, to be replaced with crude copies produced by my children.

If you’d like to contact me leave a comment here or find @tygertale on twitter

14 thoughts on “A blog about brilliant children’s books

  1. Hi there, I hope you don’t mind me contacting you like this. We are Colour Heroes and design and publish children’s historical books and activity books. I was wondering if I sent you a couple of free copies whether you would be interested in reviewing/blogging about them? Kind regards, Claire

  2. Hello! Your blog is great, very humorous! Please could we have your email address? We have a collection of books we think you would enjoy. Thanks, Sarah

  3. Fabulous! Love your post on the Puffin Annual, Puffin Post and the Kaye Webb era: your writing along with the imaginative, lavishly-illustrated design. It takes a lot to put all three together well. Introduced to you via calmgrove–thanks to both of you.

  4. Perhaps you will at some stage take a look at the peerless E. Nesbit? (But perhaps not The Railway Children)

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